For a Kinder, Gentler Society
The Crisis of Britain's Surveillance State
Security, Law Enforcement, and the Intelligence War in Cyberspace
  • Musa Khan Jalalzai
Reviews Table of Contents Introduction «Back
The Crisis of Britain's Surveillance State. Security, Law Enforcement, and the Intelligence War in Cyberspace
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Great Britain is in a great crisis, one that gets worse with every attempt to patch things up. The global spread of technology and international links enables a rapid rise in the traffic of dangerous ideas, dangerous materials and dangerous people. An international journalist ties together the common strands that create the fuse for unquenched violence in Great Britain, culminating in a many-faceted crisis for the British state.

The overwhelming picture of intrusion into people’s personal lives has caused a breakdown in trust between the citizens and the state. Five Eyes, TEMPORA, PRISM, ECHELON and the politics of the Intelligence War have shaken the public perception that their governments respect civil rights and liberties.
  
Meanwhile the British “Welfare State” faces an evolving threat from many quarters. 
  • Corruption within the police department
  • Increasing homelessness
  • An overwhelmed NHS, where doctors are prematurely ending the lives of thousands of elderly patients via the deadly “Liverpool Care Pathway” 
  • Domestic radicalization, as British nationals go off to jihad, fighting alongside their Arab al Qaeda friends. What will they do when they come home?
  • Ongoing violence in Northern Ireland as the political parties have never agreed on a power sharing formula since the Good-Friday Agreement. 
  • Illicit trade in nuclear materials, as technologies and capabilities proliferate. 

Musa Khan Jalalzai, a renowned international journalist, shows that Government's attempts to stop these holes and keep the ship of state moving are entirely inadequate to the scale and scope of challenges as we enter turbulent waters.


About the Author

Musa Khan Jalalzai is a journalist whose experience includes over 25 years extensive research in political analysis, Afghanistan, terrorism issues, and human trafficking. His articles have been published by The New Yorker, the New York Times, and Moscow Times (English-language daily). He has published several books studying sectarian and ethnic violence, policing, and terrorism in various parts of the world, as well as the increasing crime, corruption and instability in Pakistan, Afghanistan and the region.

During the First Gulf War (1991-1993) he was a research scholar at the Pakistan Institute of National Affairs where he completed two books on Persian Gulf politics. He was Executive Director of the Daily Outlook, Afghanistan (2005-2009), and is a permanent writer of articles for Pakistan's daily The Post. He has a regular column in the Daily Times (Lahore, Pakistan) and The New Nation (Bangladesh).

Mr. Jalalzai has published four books with Algora focusing on Pakistan, Afghanistan, and questions of security, law enforcement, and the global intelligence war.

About the Book

The revelations of Mr. Edward Snowden also sparked widespread outrage about the illegal surveillance mechanisms of NSA and GCHQ. The intelligence war between allies and friends broke into the open when France, Germany and Spain summoned both...

The revelations of Mr. Edward Snowden also sparked widespread outrage about the illegal surveillance mechanisms of NSA and GCHQ. The intelligence war between allies and friends broke into the open when France, Germany and Spain summoned both the UK and US ambassadors to explain the motives behind their surveillance activities.

At the same time, in response to the uprisings that have swept the Arab world, North Africa, Syria and Ukraine, concerns about possible cyber attacks (State-sponsored or otherwise) on State computers, or cyber exports, have been amplified in the media, sparking a debate as to the appropriate course of action. Now citizens understand that their own privacy is being sacrificed in the name of concerns over international security. Cyberspace has become decisive arena of modern information warfare.

Every morning we find ourselves in a far more dangerous world. With the global spread of technology and international links, we see a rapid rise in the traffic of dangerous ideas, dangerous materials and dangerous people. 

Short-term fixes and patch-up jobs are not enough. Real leadership and real solutions are urgently needed.


Introduction
Great Britain faces numerous social, political and economic crises. Unemployment and homelessness are on the rise, and hundreds of homeless and jobless people are joining criminal networks every year. The Local Government Councils are deeply involved in corruption and discrimination cases. Unaffordable rent and welfare cuts have bred a...
Great Britain faces numerous social, political and economic crises. Unemployment and homelessness are on the rise, and hundreds of homeless and jobless people are joining criminal networks every year. The Local Government Councils are deeply involved in corruption and discrimination cases. Unaffordable rent and welfare cuts have bred a benefit-fraud culture. Borough councils award contracts to corrupt construction companies for road and housing projects, in exchange for kickbacks or incentives of various kinds. Education has become a joke, false student visas, and unregistered colleges caused a security challenge.

Drug addiction, prostitution and human trafficking, terrorists and organized criminals trafficking from Pakistan, India and European states, modern slavery, and burglaries, have become more commonplace, while smugglers and marriage centers sponsor the arrival of thousands of extremists, terror suspects, gangsters and trained prostitutes from Asia, Africa and Europe, into Britain. Consequently, Britain has become the center of foreign espionage and intelligence networks. Intelligence networks of various states have established strong roots in the country. Trust has ultimately been undermined between the state security apparatus, law enforcement agencies, and the citizens. The process of citizen’s alienation from the state continues. The attitude of the police and Borough Councils has totally changed. Police and Asian communities view each other with mutual scorn. They do not trust each other, and do not want to cooperate on anything, including the fight against crime, extremism and terrorism.

On 30 October 2013, The Guardian reported the deteriorating health condition of Britain’s children and women. According to Sir Michael Marmot’s report, much of the rest of Europe takes better care of its families. Life expectancy is one measure. Half of the children live in poverty. The way NHS kills is very odd. NHS hospitals kill thousands of patients every year.

The culture of hate, racism, extremism, discrimination, and sectarianism has recently taken new roots in the country’s various districts. Some religious clerics are preaching hate, especially in mosques during Juma prayers (Friday’s congregational prayers). These are people who want to weaken Islam and create clefts among world religions, while Islam in fact, does not support this way of religious practice. These fanatics have established their own schools with their desired syllabuses teaching hate, violence and sectarianism. At present, they run more than 130 schools across the country. The case of Northern Ireland is fairly similar. In Northern Ireland, there are different sectarian schools, established with their own sectarian syllabuses.

Sectarian affiliations in government departments are considered a serious threat. Organized crime firms are doing business in their own way. A report of the Science and Innovation Program of the Police Service for 2010–2013, warned that between 25,000 and 30,000 criminals are engaged in organized crime, generating over £20 billion every year. Narcotics drugs are openly and easily smuggled in taxies, train compartments and cars. Criminal and containerized trade, and black market economy continues to challenge the traditional financial market in Britain. . . 


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Pages 244
Year: 2014
BISAC: POL033000POLITICAL SCIENCE / Globalization
BISAC: POL004000POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Freedom & Security / Civil Rights
BISAC: POL012000POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Freedom & Security / International Security
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-078-7
Price: USD 22.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-079-4
Price: USD 32.95
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