For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Bachelors Abounding
Their Mutinous March on Matrimony
  • Terry Reed
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Bachelors Abounding . Their Mutinous March on Matrimony
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Real life, literature and legends agree: the male and female human species are worlds apart - fascinated and frustrated in equal measure. Dating, marriage, and everyday communication between men and women are fraught with peril. Some of the world's most intelligent (arguably) and successful men actually chose to remain bachelors, to the understandable dismay of all the available ladies left aside.

In these pages the author aims to explore, explain and defend the unsteady reputation of wondrous bachelordom against its traditionally soiled reputation, its questionable eccentricities, its ill-comprehended motivations and its ostensibly nefarious ends.

Bachelors Abounding is comical, outspoken, at times outrageous. It's also unceasingly rich entertainment and enlightenment in equal proportion. In a word, or six, it's exceedingly difficult to put aside. Should you lend this book out, there's a 50% chance you’ll never see it again. Should your girlfriend find it, make that 100%.


About the Author

Terry Reed (Ph.D., University of Kentucky) spent his college summers sailing Lake Michigan and cycling Europe. Since then, he's been writing, while perfecting the art of bachelordom and occasionally taking time out to keep the world safe for the dry Martini. 

Over the years Terry has contributed over 330 invited articles to magazines and literary journals and has published several books, on topics ranging from Truman Capote to the Indy 500, plus the books Of Herds and Hermits: America’s Lone Wolves and Submissive Sheep (Algora Publishing, 2009), Book of Fools (Algora Publishing, 2013) and Bachelors Abounding (Algora 2016). He claims never to have worked a day in his life. 

About the Book
A considerable number of bachelor books have appeared over the years, but none that draws quite so generously as this one does from history, mythology, sociology, anthropology, theology, psychology, philosophy and the arts. Mr. Reed ponders what...
A considerable number of bachelor books have appeared over the years, but none that draws quite so generously as this one does from history, mythology, sociology, anthropology, theology, psychology, philosophy and the arts. Mr. Reed ponders what we can learn from writers like Shakespeare and Schopenhauer, Flaubert and Wilde, Danielle Steel and P.G. Wodehouse, and examines the tension between a man’s need for independence and society’s apparent need to break him in.

From Ovid to Holofernes, Henry Higgins to Sherlock Holmes, men have puzzled over those mystical beings who grace the dinner table and the dance hall but whose wave length seems ever out of range.

The author also considers scientific evidence of mental and physical differences between the genders. Noting reports that women's brains have four times as many neurons, he freely admits that "Men are more thick-headed, as women have long perceived."


Introduction
Bachelors, as a rule, are not especially well received. Befuddled married men are jealous of them; petulant unmarried women are more than a little frustrated by their understated but still firm resistance to matrimony. The origins of this perpetual dilemma lead us inexorably back to the mythic Pygmalion, the young and incomprehensibly talented...
Bachelors, as a rule, are not especially well received. Befuddled married men are jealous of them; petulant unmarried women are more than a little frustrated by their understated but still firm resistance to matrimony. The origins of this perpetual dilemma lead us inexorably back to the mythic Pygmalion, the young and incomprehensibly talented sculptor, cited by Ovid in Book X of his Latin Metamorphosis. The bacheloresque Pygmalion does not entertain a particularly favorable view of women because of what he somewhat prudishly views as their shameless behavior. Ovid also tells us (in Rolfe Humphries' translation) that Pygmalion "was so shocked at the vices/ Nature has given to the female disposition/ Only too often, [he] chose to live alone, / to have no women in his bed."  What to do? He sculpted a woman of his own, that's what.

With a little help from above, our bachelor boy has managed to fashion a woman to his own specifications, although Ovid's account leaves us with the impression that Galatea is as much the creation of his romantic imagination as it is his artistic hands. Nevertheless he succeeds in getting what he was after, to wit: the perfect woman. Today we recognize this circumstance as the Pygmalion Effect, sometimes called the Rosenthal Effect, meaning that the greater the expectation one places on people, the greater they perform. The Galatea Effect assumes that the more people are encouraged by what they're doing, the greater will be the result. Misogynistic though he once was, Pygmalion appears to be a bachelor no more. In time, however, the ivory lips he's been kissing don't kiss back. He is eventually made to realize that his ideal woman is no more than a fleeting artistic image so ingeniously sculpted that, as we are told, art has concealed art. His romantic expectations have been dashed.

We must, before any more's said, reach an understanding upon what bachelor means and has meant, and how it's spelled and has been spelled. Its etymology, by which we mean its linguistic history, is confused enough to be contestable. A bachelor was once taken to mean a male (occasionally female) in the employ of a calonuus, meaning a manor. Bachelor has also been taken to mean a yeoman (attendant, retainer, petty officer, one who is sturdy, loyal, brave, or possibly a small farmer who cultivates his own land). We should not fail to mention that a bachelor is tellingly one of the young, inexperienced and inept of the fur seal species that the adult bull seals prevent from entering the mating grounds.


Table of Contents
Chapter I. "Where the devil are my slippers, Eliza?" Chapter II."There's nothing better than the single life."— Horace Chapter III. The Foot-Long Weltanschauung Chapter IV. Bachelors
Chapter I. "Where the devil are my slippers, Eliza?"
Chapter II."There's nothing better than the single life."— Horace
Chapter III. The Foot-Long Weltanschauung
Chapter IV. Bachelors in Paradise: If life were best lived as couples, we'd all be Siamese twins
Chapter V. Gershwin's Girlfriend, Casanova's Cuties &c

Categories

Pages 188
Year: 2016
BISAC: FAM000000 FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / General
BISAC: HUM012000 HUMOR / Topic / Relationships
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-174-6
Price: USD 19.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-175-3
Price: USD 29.95
eBook
ISBN: 978-1-62894-176-0
Price: USD 19.95
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