For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Bodies in Beds
Why Business Should Stay Out of Prisons
  • Sue Binder
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Bodies in Beds. Why Business Should Stay Out of Prisons
Sound Bite
Can privatization really help solve America's prison problems? A mental health professional tells a compelling story of suicidal inmates and mistreated inmates, with staff working overtime without compensation while frustration grows.

About the Author

Sue Binder, M.A., is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and a Licensed Addictions Counselor (LAC). She worked for 13 years as a Mental Health Coordinator in a private prison owned by Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), and previously she owned and operated an agency to assist victims of domestic violence agency. She continues to work in the mental health and addictions field.

Sue holds two Master’s Degrees, one in psychology and one in humanities, and has done doctoral studies at Walden University. In addition to work as a Behavioral Health Therapist and a counselor/ supervisor in the fields of addictions and mental health, she has worked as a newspaper reporter and editor, education coordinator and associate college faculty member. She published "Hands Down: A Domestic Violence Treatment Workbook" (2006) and an Instructor's Manual for the American Correctional Association.

About the Book

Mental health workers in privatized prisons struggle to appropriately meet the needs of inmates, to help them recognize and overcome behaviors that landed them in trouble, and to help them cope with the stress of incarceration without acting...

Mental health workers in privatized prisons struggle to appropriately meet the needs of inmates, to help them recognize and overcome behaviors that landed them in trouble, and to help them cope with the stress of incarceration without acting out again. Due to the corporate focus on profit, rather than a successful outcome, staff are stretched beyond any limit.

A preoccupation with the bottom line, compounded by a bureaucratic need for paperwork, also creates unsafe conditions as there is simply not enough manpower to go around.

Most important, by cutting corners, cheating the personnel, and ignoring prisoners' health care needs, these corporations create a revolving door - offenders returning to prison - at a tremendous cost to taxpayers, to society, and to the incarcerated people themselves.


More . . .

Trump Sets Private Prisons Free

The incarceration industry was having a tough time. Then Trump got elected.

By James Surowiecki.           The New Yorker, December 5, 2016

Going into Election Day, few industries seemed in worse shape than America's private prisons. Prison populations, which had been rising for decades, were falling. In 2014, Corrections Corporation of America, the biggest private-prison company in the...

Trump Sets Private Prisons Free

The incarceration industry was having a tough time. Then Trump got elected.

By James Surowiecki.           The New Yorker, December 5, 2016

Going into Election Day, few industries seemed in worse shape than America's private prisons. Prison populations, which had been rising for decades, were falling. In 2014, Corrections Corporation of America, the biggest private-prison company in the U.S., lost its contract to run Idaho's largest prison, after lawsuits relating to understaffing and violence that had earned the place the nickname Gladiator School. ..[T]he department announced that it would phase out the use of private prisons at the federal level. Although most of the private-prison industry operates on the state level (immigrant-detention centers are its other big business), the news sent C.C.A.'s stock down by thirty-five per cent.

Donald Trump's victory changed all that: within days, C.C.A.'s stock had jumped forty-seven per cent. His faith in privatization is no secret, and prison companies aren't the only ones rubbing their hands. The stock price of for-profit schools has also rocketed. Above all, Trump's hard-line position on immigration seems certain to fill detention centers, one of the biggest money spinners for private-prison operators. Read the article in the New Yorker...



Pages 244
Year: 2017
BISAC: SOC030000 Sociology - Penology
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ISBN: 978-1-62894-264-4
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