For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Religious Overreach at the Supreme Court
  • Scott Rutledge
Reviews Table of Contents Introduction «Back
Religious Overreach at the Supreme Court.
Sound Bite
The US Supreme Court has ceased to be a strictly legal institution, if it ever was one. That's why we see such impassioned political struggles over the appointment of any new Justice to the Court. No less contentious, however, is the underlying question: What is the true nature of the new role the Court has taken upon itself as a powerful originator of new laws and policies?

About the Author

Scott Rutledge earned a JD degree from Hastings College of the Law on top of a Masters in Mathematics and Logic from Arizona State. A practicing real estate lawyer for 25 years, he also served as New Mexico's Assistant Attorney General and was an Assistant Regional Counsel, U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development. His background in logic studies inclines him strongly against accepting at face value the Supreme Court’s contorted explanations of its jurisprudence of religion, a terribly tangled and patchwork body of doctrine.

About the Book
These questions are addressed here through a careful selection and reassessment of a dozen very interesting and controversial rulings. Scott Rutledge, JD, argues that the Justices have handed down decisions which are essentially religious in...
These questions are addressed here through a careful selection and reassessment of a dozen very interesting and controversial rulings. Scott Rutledge, JD, argues that the Justices have handed down decisions which are essentially religious in character, while speaking the language of constitutional judgment. The main role of the Supreme Court is to ensure that our laws conform to the rules set forth in the US Constitution. When the Supreme Court issues a supposedly constitutional decision lacking any persuasive, sometimes even any plausible connection to the text of the Constitution, what is happening? How should we understand the role in American government which the Justices are claiming as their own? A great many citizens of the United States are perplexed, or distressed ; or occasionally inspired ; by the nation's highest tribunal. The Court's political power rivals that of Congress and the Presidency. The Justices;¢ ambitions seem vast. And so the nomination and appointment of a new Justice, historically uncontroversial, has become instead an occasion for alarm and struggle.
Preface
The statesmen who founded the American Republic managed to put a case for plural government before the world with exceptional force and clarity. They offered a detailed and pragmatic plan, one quite disappointing to any partisan of governmental...
The statesmen who founded the American Republic managed to put a case for plural government before the world with exceptional force and clarity. They offered a detailed and pragmatic plan, one quite disappointing to any partisan of governmental uniformity, for the preservation of many ways, legal, political, and religious, among the American people.One topic, moreover, illuminated especially well the novelties introduced in 1787. One topic, the first to be addressed in the Bill of Rights of 1791, shone the brightest of lights upon the letter and the spirit of the Constitution of the United States.In their approach to that most sensitive of concerns, religion, the American founders created something new under the sun.
Categories

Pages 158
Year: 2018
BISAC: POL040030 POLITICAL SCIENCEÃ??' / American Government / Judicial Branch
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-360-3
Price: USD 19.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-361-0
Price: USD 29.95
eBook
ISBN: 978-1-62894-362-7
Price: USD 19.95
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